Musicophilia Daily

[Audio] – Michael Rother – “Zeni” (1977)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on June 18, 2009

Michael Rother with Jaki Liebezeit – “Zeni” (1977)

While I would say Klaus Dinger‘s post-Neu! work (especially via La Dusseldorf, whom you can check out here) is generally fuller and more energetic than Michael Rother’s, the latter was buoyed by the involvement of Can‘s Jaki Liebezeit, who ably brings Dinger’s Motorik drumming to Rother’s airy and stirring melodic tendencies with the guitar and synthesizer.  Other tracks are more representative of the flying-down-the-Autobahn side of Neu!, while this one is closer to the bands more contemplative, minor-key work, with Liebezeit emphasising the toms.  [For more Can and post-Can music like this, be sure to check out two recent Can-centric mixes at Musicophilia.]

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[Audio] – Brainticket – “One Morning” (1972)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on May 18, 2009

Brainticket – “One Morning” (1972)

With only a few exceptions, “Krautrock” has been a genre of the haves and the have-nots, for me: a few top tiers of very few acts of greatness, and a precipitous drop-off to the (wanky, noodling) rest.  So I haven’t experienced a lot of “lost gems;” but if Brainticket is Krautrock (given that it’s made by Swiss, Italian and German musicians) the first two albums are gems.  I prefer the second album, ‘Psychonaut’.  If you can find it, grab the two-fer that houses the the first two albums.  This track makes might appeal to fans of Animal Collective, based on what I’ve heard of their work, with it’s off-kilter, pretty-but-tense weirdo-folk feeling.

[Audio] – Faust – “The Lurcher/Krautrock/Do So” (Live, BBC) (1973)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on April 8, 2009

Faust – “The Lurcher/Krautrock/Do So” (Live, BBC) (1973)

Don’t miss this one. This twenty-minute medley expresses a wide swath of Faust’s power and prescience.  The first section, “The Lurcher,” is a drunken Germanic breakbeat-funk with treated saxophone and ethereal guitar that must have seemed to be coming from the future to whoever actually heard this performance in March of 1973.  The second section, “Krautrock,” must have sent plenty running, if they hadn’t already; but those who remained in the center of this maelstrom-meditation may have experienced a religious conversion (even though Faust may have been having a pisstake at a nonsensical genre they never really fit, their humor was often sublime).  And after all the build up, humor comes to the fore, as Faust reminds everyone not to take it all too seriously with “Do So,” a bent little pop ditty that is subtly as cyclical as their longer works disguised in song-form.  If you haven’t heard this performance before–or especially if somehow you haven’t heard Faust before–I envy you the experience.   For me, in contrast with Can, Faust took years to fully seep in, but once they did there was no going back–these sounds can reshape your ears.  [For more Faust, check Musicophilia for a number of mixes.]