Musicophilia Daily

[Audio] – David Axelrod – “The Human Abstract” (1969)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on September 1, 2009

David Axelrod – “The Human Abstract” (1969)

Following up the recent post of two brilliant Electric Prunes-in-name-only tracks, here is another utterly unclassifiable, stunningly beautiful piece by David Axelrod.  This is one of those guaranteed-goosebumps tracks, for me–the very definition of timelessness, masterfully combining stunning orchestral arrangement with an electrifying and effortlessly funky bass and drum combo.  Gainbourg’s strings man Jean-Claude Vennier would’ve killed to compose this track.  Axelrod is a master of the understated theme, repeating a three or four note pattern in such a way as to produce incredible emotional tension and, eventually, maximum release.  There’s just not enough music like this, but I doubt there ever could’ve been.  If you generally dig what Musicophilia and Musicophilia Daily are about, run and buy any Axelrod album from ’68 through ’75 and be prepared to be lifted to ecstasy.

[Audio] – Jane Birkin – “Kawasaki” (1973)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on June 1, 2009

Jane Birkin – “Kawasaki” (1973)

Birkin’s work here is indelibly imprinted with the signatures of Serge Gainsbourg and Jean-Claude Vannier in top-flight ‘Melody Nelson’ mode, and that’s hardly a bad thing: those whirling strings, spare funky drums and bass, weeping guitar, and balanced temperaments of dynamism and melancholy are effective as ever.  But Birkin’s half-sung, half-breathed vocals add a nice counterpoint to Gainsbourg’s more earthy speak-sing.  The coy, coquettish album cover doesn’t hurt.

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[Audio] – Brian Eno – “French Catalogues (Variations on Pachelbel’s Canon in D Maj., II)” (1975)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on May 21, 2009

Brian Eno – “French Catalogues (Variations on Pachelbel’s Canon in D Maj., II)” (1975)

It’s the second, non-titular side of Eno’s ‘Discreet Music’ that has always affected me more deeply, and fascinated me most.  Taking a classical work the beauty of which can sometimes be forgotten because of over- and misuse, Eno applies ostensibly cerebral experimentation, altering component elements of the score via mathematical formula.  But the results, while perhaps momentarily disorientating, and intellectually engaging, are remarkably visceral; perhaps by breaking down our overfamiliar expectations the “experiment” create a heightened awareness of the existing beauty, while adding new beauty.  That’s always been the trick of Eno, blurring the lines between the brain and the body, a “non-musician” getting in there and going at it without being in the least bit “punk” about it.  But his variations on Pachelbel’s Canon in D are underrated pieces in his well-earned reputation.  [The many sides of Eno are explored through similarly varied mixes at Musicophilia.]

[Audio] – Curtis Mayfield – “(Don’t Worry) If There’s A Hell Below. . .” (1970)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on April 23, 2009

Curtis Mayfield – “(Don’t Worry) If There’s A Hell Below, We’re All Going To Go” (1970)

Curtis Mayfield can have a lot going on in his tracks, but they never feel over-stuffed.  Mayfield could absorb larger-scale soundtrack-ready arrangements of brass and strings without losing any of the sharp melodicism or the funk, a balance he was one of the first to master.  In that vein, this track has long been one of my favorites–a real gateway drug to the musical joys of the 70s.  Here the strings feel especially integral, not aloof in that great Gainsbourg/Vannier way but sharp and directly interacting with the rhythm instruments.  But the tops is that fuzz-bass and the dubbed-out echos whenever Mayfield refrains, “don’t worry”.

[Audio] – The Blue Nile – “A Walk Acros the Rooftops” (1984)

Posted in Audio by Soundslike on March 12, 2009

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The Blue Nile – “A Walk Across the Rooftops” (1984)

Famously financed by a hi-fi tech company, The Blue Nile’s first LP fortunately has the musical sophistication and artistry to warrant luxe treatment.  To my ears a forebear of Talk Talk’s later wide-screen works–with a judicious use of space in the mix, careful and subtly unusual staging and instrumentation, and expansive dynamics, this album is also emotionally resonant belying its supposed “audiophile demonstration record” roots. [Blue Nile are featured with their first glorious single here in a 1981 mix on Musicophilia.]